Reflection

Initially, my idea was to go around and interview people about how they felt about change in Bozeman.  But, no pun intended, things change.  Especially so during the creative process.  During the first bit of class time we were given to work on our projects, I typed up a script.  Plan B.  When the time came to make the movie, I followed the outline quite closely for the most part.  (Some scenes were omitted for the sake of time.  3 minutes happens fast.)  I was not anticipating this, as I tend to be the sort of person who makes a grocery list and forgets to bring it to the store.  In doing so, I noticed how it pays off to organize your thoughts before starting a project.  Of course, much of what makes this short film mildly amusing are the impromptu moments, like the extreme Wisconsin accent I end up using, or the active involvement of the two dogs.  When I compare this approach to that of my prose writing, it seems to be more relaxed.  I didn’t bend over backwards trying to get every last sentence perfect.  Rather, I limited myself to 10 scenes.  I wrote out the dialogue in italics, and below it I included bullet points about what I hoped the camera would capture.  The simplicity of the script felt good in my hands.  It was comforting to know it was there, keeping me on track.  Some of the lines surprised me, at how appropriate they felt, when I actually read them aloud for the movie.  And how timing them just right with a particular scene amplified the intended effect.  I wish I could say that I didn’t intend for it to be a satire, maybe deep down I didn’t, but from the get-go in the writing process that’s where it went.  When it came time to add a song, Dido was the only artist that came to mind.  First, I thought “White Flag.”  Mark plugged in his external hard drive and found the album Life for Rent, waiting desperately to be used.  I saw “Don’t Leave Home,” and said, “That’s the one!”  I have a PC, but I am more of a Mac person when it comes to doing anything other than opening Word documents.  He let me borrow his computer, his iMovie.  Mark was the camera operator.  That, too, happened on the spot.  I was imagining doing most of the actual filming, because I like that sort of thing and do it on occasion.  But the script sort of lent itself to me being the actor/narrator.  It was a cool experience for us, and honestly something we are happy to have done.  The sentiment surrounding our life in Bozeman is that it is somewhat fleeting—at least living where we do.  One thing I’ll add:  This is a rookie film, for sure.  The editing is appropriate for the style, I think, but it could be refined.  I like that it’s not perfect.  What’s something I know now that I didn’t before?  I really liked writing and directing this short film, and look forward to making more.  If even just for the sake of posterity.  To take clips of video is one thing, but to compile them and create a living breathing finished product is quite another.  Now I feel like I have the confidence to try something new.  Maybe I have what it takes to leave the premises.

IMG_0403.jpg
The script.

The script.